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Concern from Jason Hope over the Rise of Exploitation in IoT Vulnerabilities by Hackers

Everyone today knows how important and difficult it is to protect your personal data, credit cards, Social Security Number, your current location, etc. However, with the proliferation of IoT-enabled devices, many of which are small and low-powered, hackers are increasingly finding new places to sneak inside.

The prime concern of Jason Hope, a member of the IoT Council, is that unless your device, be it a pacemaker, your new fridge, or even the coffee maker at the local Starbucks, has the encrypting power of a current Android or iPhone, a basic login password will simply not be enough to protect it anymore, and e-commerce is making this all too real. The aforementioned coffee maker could be connecting your latte to your bank account, and in doing so, leaking said data to the guy hidden in the corner on his iPad, presumably surfing the web. Visit his facebook to learn more about his platforms.

Also, there is the rapidly increasing market for smart-home devices, most of which are connected over IoT, and, as Jason Hope is quick to point out, with “their remote management software, IoT devices are often seen as wide open for remote exploitation.” 1 Basically, with a knockoff IoT door lock, well, you might as well leave the front door wide open for hackers to stroll through.

What I am saying is, or rather, Jason Hope is meaning, is with the “recent rise in IoT device attacks and the attractiveness to hackers of sensitive data-laden interfaces,” 1 the current protection protocols are simply not enough anymore in today’s digital age, while an IoT lock may not have any sensitive data on it, the interior of your house will. While the odds of someone maliciously taking over a pacemaker or a Goggle Chrome car may seem low (and they are), such acts are not outside the realm of possibility. Simply put, if it connects, it will be connected, one way or another.

Jason Hope is actively urging manufacturers of IoT devices to employ digitally signed and encrypted firmware within said devices, as a baseline expectation at the very least. Such improvements should stop casual attacks from even knocking on the metaphorical door. Also, on a website both named and run Jason Hope himself, he stresses how vitally important it is to still maintain a strong password, and to change it frequently, especially if you have an IoT-enabled vehicle. A password might not always stop a hacker, but a strong one may just prevent one from walking right through the front door. Literally.

Read more: http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/entrepreneur-jason-hope-invests-in-research-against-aging-1929598.htm